Vermeer and music
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Vermeer and music the art of love and leisure by Marjorie E. Wieseman

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Published by National Gallery Company, Distributed by Yale University Press in London, New Haven, Connecticut .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Dutch Painting,
  • Musical instruments in art,
  • Themes, motives,
  • Exhibitions,
  • Music in art

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementMarjorie E. Wieseman
ContributionsNational Gallery (Great Britain)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsND646 .W54x 2013
The Physical Object
Pagination79 pages
Number of Pages79
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL27153060M
ISBN 101857095677
ISBN 109781857095678
LC Control Number2012954755
OCLC/WorldCa813393520

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Music was a key facet of 17th-century Dutch life, in both public and private. Of Vermeer's thirty-six surviving paintings, twelve depict musical themes or a musical instrument. These include the magnificent Young Woman Standing at a Virginal, Young Woman Seated at a Virginal, The Music Lesson, and The Guitar Player, all featured in this book. Vermeer of Delft has long been one of my very favorite artists. I own a book of his complete works by Albert Blankert, published by Phaidon, which is a fine compendium by an authority on the subject of Vermeer and have savored over the images for many by: 1. The textual material contained in the Essential Vermeer Interactive Catalogue would fill a hefty-sized book, and is enhanced by more than 1, corollary images. In order to use the catalogue most advantageously: 1. Slowly scroll your mouse over the painting to a point of particular interest. The Music Lesson, Woman Seated at a Virginal or A Lady at the Virginals with a Gentleman by Johannes Vermeer is a painting of a young female pupil receiving a music lesson from a man. The man's mouth is slightly agape giving the impression that he is singing along with the music that the young girl is playing.

Vermeer and Music also features details from a selection of seventeenth-century songbooks, charming volumes filled with love songs, poems, and illustrations of amorous duets. Vermeer and Music will appeal to anyone who loves music, or the art of Vermeer and his illustrious contemporaries. View spreads of this book (2 MB PDF). Five magnificent paintings by Johannes Vermeer—the National Gallery's A Young Woman standing at a Virginal and A Young Woman seated at a Virginal, The Music Lesson (The Royal Collection), Young Woman seated at a Virginal (private collection), and The Guitar Player, on loan from Kenwood House, London—form the heart of this book. Vermeer and. Featuring the Academy of Ancient Music as Resident Ensemble. Explore the musical pastimes of the 17th-century Netherlands through this exhibition combining the art of Vermeer and his contemporaries with rare musical instruments, songbooks and live music. Johannes Vermeer (in Dutch, [vərˈmeːr]; in English, / v ɜːr ˈ m ɛər / or / v ɜːr ˈ m ɪər / vur-MEER, see below; October – December ), original name Jan Vermeer van Delft, was a Dutch Baroque Period painter who specialized in domestic interior scenes of middle class life. During his lifetime, he was a moderately successful provincial genre painter, recognized in Delft.

  “The Music Lesson Narratives within narratives are the structure and contents of Wayne Franits’s recent book Vermeer, published by Phaidon. It’s a much needed text, integrating current. The Guitar Player is an oil painting by Dutch Baroque artist Johannes Vermeer ( - ), dated c. This work of art is one of Vermeer's final artistic activities, providing insight into the techniques he mastered and approaches to painting he favored. Music was a key facet of 17th-century Dutch life, in both public and private. Of Vermeer's thirty-six surviving paintings, twelve depict musical themes or a musical instrument. These include the magnificent Young Woman Standing at a Virginal, Young Woman Seated at a Virginal, The Music Lesson, and The Guitar Player, all featured in this book Author: Marjorie E. Wieseman. Although Vermeer's courting young couple is not actively engaged in music making, the cittern on the table and the opened music book make it clear that the picture belongs to this popular motif. In the second half of the 17th century, the association between music and love was well established in the arts and the musical duet was a metaphor for.